ISAAC ASIMOV FOUNDATION SERIES EBOOK

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The story of our future begins with the Foundation. Named the best series of all time by the Hugo Awards, the Foundation novels of Isaac Asimov unquestionably . A THOUSAND-YEAR EPIC, A GALACTIC STRUGGLE, A MONUMENTAL WORK IN THE ANNALS OF SCIENCE FICTION FOUNDATION. Editorial Reviews. biosamnewbcropdic.ga Review. Foundation marks the first of a series of tales set so far #12 in Classic Science Fiction eBooks; #23 in Classic American Fiction; #77 in Hard Science Fiction (site Store). Would you like to tell us.


Isaac Asimov Foundation Series Ebook

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Editorial Reviews. biosamnewbcropdic.ga Review. Foundation marks the first of a series of tales set so far Foundation (The Foundation Series) - site edition by Isaac Asimov. Download it once and read it on your site device, PC, phones or tablets. The Foundation series is a science fiction series by Isaac Asimov. For nearly thirty years, the series was a trilogy: Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second . a little more money by having the Foundation series reprinted in book form. I offered the .. Isaac Asimov was born in the Soviet Union to his great surprise.

They have sold well and steadily, both in hardcover and softcover, for two decades so far. Increasingly, the letters I received from the readers spoke of them in high praise. They received more attention than all my other books put together. That omnibus volume has been continuously featured by the Book Club for over twenty years.

Matters reached a climax in The fans organizing the World Science Fiction Convention for that year to be held in Cleveland decided to award a Hugo for the best all-time series, where the series, to qualify, had to consist of at least three connected novels. It was the first time such a category had been set up, nor has it been repeated since. The Foundation series was nominated, and I felt that was going to have to be glory enough for me, since I was sure that Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" would win.

It didn't. The Foundation series won, and the Hugo I received for it has been sitting on my bookcase in the livingroom ever since. In among all this litany of success, both in money and in fame, there was one annoying side-effect. Readers couldn't help but notice that the books of the Foundation series covered only three hundred-plus years of the thousand-year hiatus between Empires.

That meant the Foundation series "wasn't finished. Worse yet, various editors at Doubleday over the years have pointed out that it might be wise to finish it. It was flattering, of course, but irritating as well. Years had passed, then decades. Now I wasn't.

Starting in the late s, I had been in a more and more nonfiction-writing mood. That didn't mean I was writing no fiction at all. In the s and s, in fact, I wrote two sciencefiction novels and a mystery novel, to say nothing of well over a hundred short stories — but about eighty percent of what I wrote was nonfiction.

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One of the most indefatigable nags in the matter of finishing the Foundation series was my good friend, the great science-fiction writer, Lester del Rey. He was constantly telling me I ought to finish the series and was just as constantly suggesting plot devices. He even told Larry Ashmead, then my editor at Doubleday, that if I refused to write more Foundation stories, he, Lester, would be willing to take on the task.

When Ashmead mentioned this to me in , I began another Foundation novel out of sheer desperation. I called it "Lightning Rod" and managed to write fourteen pages before other tasks called me away. The fourteen pages were put away and additional years passed. In January , Cathleen Jordan, then my editor at Doubleday, suggested I do "an important book — a Foundation novel, perhaps. In January , Doubleday apparently lost its temper.

At least, Hugh O'Neill, then my editor there, said, "Betty Prashker wants to see you," and marched me into her office. She was then one of the senior editors, and a sweet and gentle person. She wasted no time. I don't like large advances. They put me under too great an obligation. Why not? It's all out of royalties.

I said, "That's way too much money, Betty. It won't. Have the contract read that I don't get any money until I notify you in writing that I have begun the novel. That night, Pat LoBrutto, the science-fiction editor at Doubleday called to express his pleasure. And when we say 'science-fiction novel,' we mean 'Foundation novel' and not anything else.

[PDF] Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series [Read] Full Ebook

I moaned that I was not my own master anymore and Hugh O'Neill said, cheerfully, "That's right, and from now on, we're going to call every other week and say, 'Where's the manuscript? They left me strictly alone, and never even asked for a progress report. Nearly four months passed while I took care of a vast number of things I had to do, but about the end of May, I picked up my own copy of The Foundation Trilogy and began reading. I had to. For one thing, I hadn't read the Trilogy in thirty years and while I remembered the general plot, I did not remember the details.

Besides, before beginning a new Foundation novel I had to immerse myself in the style and atmosphere of the series.

I read it with mounting uneasiness. The mere fact of the existence of the Trilogy pleased me, but Gnome Press did not have the financial clout or the publishing knowhow to get the books distributed properly, so that few copies were sold and fewer still paid me royalties. Any money that was involved was paid to Gnome Press and I didn't see much of that.

And yet there was some foreign interest. In early , Timothy Seldes, who was then my editor at Doubleday, told me that Doubleday had received a request for the Portuguese rights for the Foundation series and, since they weren't Doubleday books, he was passing them on to me.

I sighed and said, "The heck with it, Tim. I don't get royalties on those books. He paid no attention to my loudly expressed fears that Doubleday "would lose its shirt on them.

What's more, Avon Books, which had published a paperback version of Second Foundation, set about obtaining the rights to all three from Doubleday, and put out nice editions. From that moment on, the Foundation books took off and began to earn increasing royalties.

They have sold well and steadily, both in hardcover and softcover, for two decades so far. Increasingly, the letters I received from the readers spoke of them in high praise.

They received more attention than all my other books put together. That omnibus volume has been continuously featured by the Book Club for over twenty years. Matters reached a climax in The fans organizing the World Science Fiction Convention for that year to be held in Cleveland decided to award a Hugo for the best all-time series, where the series, to qualify, had to consist of at least three connected novels.

It was the first time such a category had been set up, nor has it been repeated since.

Foundation (Chronological Order) Series

The Foundation series was nominated, and I felt that was going to have to be glory enough for me, since I was sure that Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" would win.

It didn't. The Foundation series won, and the Hugo I received for it has been sitting on my bookcase in the livingroom ever since. In among all this litany of success, both in money and in fame, there was one annoying side-effect. Readers couldn't help but notice that the books of the Foundation series covered only three hundred-plus years of the thousand-year hiatus between Empires.

That meant the Foundation series "wasn't finished. Worse yet, various editors at Doubleday over the years have pointed out that it might be wise to finish it. It was flattering, of course, but irritating as well. Years had passed, then decades. Now I wasn't. Starting in the late s, I had been in a more and more nonfiction-writing mood. That didn't mean I was writing no fiction at all.

In the s and s, in fact, I wrote two sciencefiction novels and a mystery novel, to say nothing of well over a hundred short stories — but about eighty percent of what I wrote was nonfiction.

One of the most indefatigable nags in the matter of finishing the Foundation series was my good friend, the great science-fiction writer, Lester del Rey. He was constantly telling me I ought to finish the series and was just as constantly suggesting plot devices. He even told Larry Ashmead, then my editor at Doubleday, that if I refused to write more Foundation stories, he, Lester, would be willing to take on the task.

When Ashmead mentioned this to me in , I began another Foundation novel out of sheer desperation. I called it "Lightning Rod" and managed to write fourteen pages before other tasks called me away. The fourteen pages were put away and additional years passed. In January , Cathleen Jordan, then my editor at Doubleday, suggested I do "an important book — a Foundation novel, perhaps.

In January , Doubleday apparently lost its temper. At least, Hugh O'Neill, then my editor there, said, "Betty Prashker wants to see you," and marched me into her office. She was then one of the senior editors, and a sweet and gentle person.

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She wasted no time. I don't like large advances.

They put me under too great an obligation. Why not? It's all out of royalties. I said, "That's way too much money, Betty. It won't. Have the contract read that I don't get any money until I notify you in writing that I have begun the novel. Soon Trantor would lie in ruins. Chaos would overtake humanity. But the Seldon Plan was a long term strategy to minimize the worst of what was to come.

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Two Foundations were set up at opposite ends of the galaxy. Of the Second nothing can be told. It guards the secrets of psychohisotry. Foundation is the story of the First Foundation, on the remote planet of Terminus, from which those secrets were withheld.Surely you don' like the breeze gustin' like this?

But rumors persist that the Second Foundation is not destroyed after all—and that its still-defiant survivors are preparing their revenge. Everyone except Hari Seldon. In spite of its undoubted inferiority in purely military terms the Foundation emerges as the victor and the Empire itself is defeated.

The three books together came to be called The Foundation Trilogy. The board is still wary, but allows Seldon to assemble whomever he needs, provided he and the "Encyclopedists" be exiled to a remote planet, Terminus.

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